Comm-Link:Galactic Guide - Earth & New Jump Point

Comm-Link archive on the Star Citizen Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Comm-Link-Earthjp-Nyc.png
Galactic Guide - Earth & New Jump Point
Source RSInotext.svg  Galactic Guide - Earth & New Jump Point
{{RSI|ref=yes|text=Galactic Guide - Earth & New Jump Point|int=Comm-Link:Galactic Guide - Earth & New Jump Point|url=https://robertsspaceindustries.com/comm-link/spectrum-dispatch/13014-Earth-amp-New-Jump-Point}}
Publication Date 2013-05-31
Type Spectrum Dispatch
Series Galactic Guide
In the series
Title Publication Date
Galactic Guide: Anvil Aerospace 2013-04-23
Galactic Guide - Earth & New Jump Point 2013-05-31
Galactic Guide - Stanton System 2013-07-12
Galactic Guide - Hurston Dynamics 2013-07-23
Galactic Guide - Terra 2013-07-26
Galactic Guide: Oberon System 2016-07-23
Galactic Guide: Banshee System 2016-06-22
Galactic Guide: Nemo System 2016-06-15
Galactic Guide: Chronos System 2016-05-05
Galactic Guide: Kayfa 2016-04-06
Galactic Guide: Rhetor System 2015-11-10
Galactic Guide: Croshaw System 2015-10-20
Galactic Guide: Kastak Arms 2015-10-06
Galactic Guide: Ferron System 2015-10-06
Galactic Guide: Osiris System 2015-08-07
Galactic Guide: Castra System 2015-08-05
Galactic Guide: Kruger Intergalactic 2015-07-29
Galactic Guide: ArcCorp 2015-04-29
Galactic Guide: Vega System 2015-04-22
Galactic Guide: Tyrol System 2015-04-15
Galactic Guide: 78th Squadron 2015-04-08
Galactic Guide: Helios System 2015-03-15
Galactic Guide: Accelerated Mass Design 2015-03-08
Galactic Guide: Virgil System 2015-02-19
Galactic Guide: Squad 214, Bravo Flight 2015-02-05
Galactic Guide: Hades System 2015-01-07
Galactic Guide: Nyx 2015-01-01
Galactic Guide: Sakura Sun 2014-12-30
Galactic Guide: Gold Horizon 2014-12-23
Galactic Guide: 36th Fighter Squadron 2014-11-20
Galactic Guide: Nul System 2014-11-19
Galactic Guide: GNP 2014-11-12
Galactic Guide: Taranis 2014-10-29
Galactic Guide: Baker System 2014-10-15
Galactic Guide: The Murray Cup 2014-10-01
Galactic Guide: Consolidated Outland 2014-09-23
Galactic Guide: Bremen 2014-09-16
Galactic Guide: WillsOps Systems 2014-08-05
Galactic Guide: Rihlah System 2014-07-29
Galactic Guide: Stor-All 2014-06-17
Galactic Guide: Corel System 2014-06-10
Galactic Guide: Behring Applied Technology 2014-05-27
Galactic Guide: Original Systems 2014-05-20
Galactic Guide: Pyro 2014-05-06
Galactic Guide: Odin 2014-04-15
Galactic Guide: Tiber 2014-03-04
Galactic Guide: Davien 2014-02-11
Galactic Guide: Aegis Dynamics 2014-01-30
Galactic Guide: Drake Interplanetary 2014-01-08
Galactic Guide: Magnus 2014-01-02
Galactic Guide: MISC 2013-12-19
Galactic Guide: Centauri 2013-12-10
Galactic Guide: Goss 2013-12-02
Galactic Guide: Klaus & Werner 2013-10-28
Galactic Guide: Ellis System 2013-10-07
Galactic Guide: Hangar Manufacturers 2013-09-30
Galactic Guide: Kilian System 2014-12-23
Galactic Guide: ORIGIN 2013-08-02
Galactic Guide: Horus System 2016-02-09
Galactic Guide: Nexus System 2015-12-22
Galactic Guide: Orion System 2013-06-17
Galactic Guide: Oso System 2015-07-08
Galactic Guide: Tayac 2016-02-03
Galactic Guide: Cubby Blast 2015-07-17
Galactic Guide: Covalex Shipping 2015-06-26
Galactic Guide: Cathcart System 2013-04-16
Galactic Guide: Kellog System 2018-01-10
Galactic Guide: Caliban System 2018-04-11
Galactic Guide: Tal System 2018-03-14
Galactic Guide: Leir System 2018-10-17
Galactic Guide: Kiel System 2018-12-12
Galactic Guide - Kabal System 2019-01-09
Galactic Guide: Kallis System 2019-04-03
Galactic Guide: Gliese System 2019-07-03
Galactic Guide: Garron System 2019-06-12

Greetings Citizens,

Jump Point Magazine

It’s Jump Point day for subscribers! If you’re a development subscriber, the sixth issue of the monthly magazine can now be found in your Subscriber area. This month you’ll learn about the making of the Constellation, visit the Stanton System, learn about weapons maker Hurston Dynamics and thrill at the latest Void Rats installment from Doug Niles. Interested in getting Jump Point each month? Information about becoming a subscriber is RSInotext.svg available here.

As always, we like to provide everyone with some of the material from a previous Jump Point. This week we’re releasing the Galactic Guide to Earth from Issue #5. Note that the original Shanghai section has been corrected to reflect change to Shanghai… so your Jump Point PDFs are a collector’s edition!

Galactic Guide: Earth

Comm-Link-Earthjp-Nyc.png

Earth: cradle of Humanity, heart of the Empire, birthplace of mankind... and a difficult place to turn a profit. It’s no secret that Earth is set in its ways. All roads lead to Earth and the system is designed to support native-born Humans above all others. Tax policies support Earth-based corporations at the extreme disadvantage of those based on worlds like Terra, while representation in the UEE Senate continues to skew disproportionately in favor of Earth’s populace. Put simply, Earth is the capital and namesake of the United Empire of Earth and it is the seat of power that governs everything from rising systems like Terra to distant colony worlds that barely impact the homeworlds’ economies. Home to the Imperator and the UEE Senate, Earth sets the standards for everything that happens in the Empire, from moderating economic models, to setting social trends, to organizing military campaigns. While other more strategically located star systems, like Terra, have begun to make claims for higher standing in the Empire, Earth is still the acknowledged center of the universe.

Contrarily, Earth wants for everything. Thousands of years of Human civilization have left many of the planet’s natural resources exhausted and the system imports trillions upon trillions of tons of food, raw metals, manufactured goods and everything else imaginable. If it were not for the so-called “balance tariffs” keeping prices uncompetitive, this would be an ideal situation for any erstwhile shipping magnate. As it is, a run to Earth can barely be guaranteed to provide more than a 5% profit... and that’s before you get to the exorbitant docking and refueling fees for spacecraft carrying other systems’ registration numbers.

Earth is also safe, to an extreme. The UEE military, Advocacy and various police arms patrol the system ceaselessly and they are notoriously uncompromising when it comes to punishing wrongdoers in the system. There is no faster way to get an extremely high bounty on your head than to commit a crime, even a minor infraction, in space near Earth. The military dockyards in Earth orbit are home port to no less than five Bengal-class carriers and at least one is drydocked at any given time.

The planet itself is pockmarked with starports, a natural evolution of nearly a millennium of Human space travel. Three of these have taken the throne as the significant import/export centers of the world: New York in North America, Moscow in Europe and Shanghai in Asia.

New York

NYC refined.jpg

New York is the cultural capital of the UEE, an intergalactic tastemaker and a celebrated blending of both old-style architecture and ultra-modern arcology construction. Most visitors immediately take note of the historical landmarks protected by a thick layer of domed visicrete, allowing such institutions as the Empire State Building and Central Park to continue to exist amidst a modern landscape of massive supertowers. In terms of commodities, selling bulk goods in New York is like trying to get blood from a stone. Nowhere is more protected by UEE law than this city, and anyone but the most desperate traders are advised not to bother. Even black market goods are extremely risky, as it is unquestionably the most well-policed area in known space. However, New Yorkers — even those who have never left the planet — still fancy themselves cosmopolitan men-of-the galaxy. As such, there is an active market for cultural trinkets from distant stars. Trendy New York galleries happily display everything from Hadesian ice shoes to damaged Xi’an engine coils... a vivid example of one man’s trash being another’s treasure.

New York is also home to the famed Roberts Space Industries headquarters complex, featuring a showroom and museum. Many visitors make it a point to pay their respects upon arriving in the port, celebrating RSI’s involvement in introducing mankind to the stars.

Possibly New York’s greatest importance is that it truly is the junction point of the universe in terms of trading. While Earth produces few valuable raw materials in this day and age, almost everything moves through its most significant port on its way somewhere in the UEE. If you’re on the prowl for a particularly rare upgrade or an extremely special commodity, the shopping district surrounding New York’s spaceport is the place to seek it.

Moscow

Sol moscow refined thumb.jpg

Moscow is a no-nonsense kind of town with more of an urban blue-collar vibe than New York. Moscow is a major distribution center for manufactured goods, in particular jump engines and thrusters produced in the factory complexes that span the Urals. Goods are moved into the city for dispersal to the stars through a system of high-speed transport trains. Down on their luck spacers can always find hard work in the Moscow dockyards, which account for the vast majority of Earth’s export shipping.

Despite this, Moscow is not a manufacturing town and has little need for raw materials (which are sourced elsewhere). The city tends to have a taste for the opulent, and luxury goods sell as well as anything can on Earth. Traders are advised to ship high-end electronics, artwork, high quality foods and various non-offensive black market items to Moscow before trying to turn a profit running guns or metals.

Shanghai

Aerialshot beijing refined2.jpg

The largest starport in Asia, Shanghai has retained more of a link to the surrounding environment than the vast cityscapes of Moscow or New York. Though still a bustling metropolis, Shanghai is your best chance for seeing a bit of foliage or natural water. Shanghai boasts rail and transit lines stretching to the nearby East China sea, a port region capable of water-docking some larger types of spacecraft. The Aegis China factory produces Idris-class corvettes and puts them through their pre-space trials in the area.

Shanghai has a need for raw materials, especially rarer extragalactic varieties. The less likely a material is to be found on Earth, the more valuable it will be on the commodities market in Shanghai; think Vanduul kan ores, thermacrete, isometal and the like. There is a bustling black market in the city, unlike any found in Earth’s other major ports: if you’re on the hunt for illegal cyborg upgrades, try Shanghai first.